wikileaks ico  Home papers ico  Cables mirror and Afghan War Diary privacy policy  Privacy
IdentifierCreatedClassificationOrigin
09BEIJING2295 2009-08-11 08:45:00 UNCLASSIFIED Embassy Beijing
Cable title:  

MEDIA REACTION: CAN CHINA SAVE THE WORLD?, U.S. AND CHINA

Tags:   PREL ECON KMDR OPRC CH 
pdf how-to read a cable
VZCZCXRO9377
RR RUEHCN RUEHGH RUEHVC
DE RUEHBJ #2295 2230845
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 110845Z AUG 09
FM AMEMBASSY BEIJING
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 5595
INFO RUEHOO/CHINA POSTS COLLECTIVE
RHMFIUU/CDR USPACOM HONOLULU HI
					  UNCLAS BEIJING 002295 

DEPARTMENT FOR INR/R/MR, EAP/CM, EAP/PA, EAP/PD, C
HQ PACOM FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR (J007)
SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PREL ECON KMDR OPRC CH

SUBJECT: MEDIA REACTION: CAN CHINA SAVE THE WORLD?, U.S. AND CHINA
IN AFRICA, U.S.-CHINA TRADE RELATIONS

--------------------
Editorial Quotes
--------------------



1. CAN CHINA SAVE THE WORLD?

"More communication and exchanges needed"

The official Communist Party People's Daily (Renmin Ribao) (08/10):
"Time magazine recently published a cover story with the title, 'Can
China save the world?' which has once again focused international
media attention on China. This attention is obviously related to
the global financial crisis, which analysts argue has pushed China
to the front of the world stage too early. The world believes that
once China recovers from the financial crisis and demonstrates the
capability to withstand economic difficulties, the influence of its
successful economic model will grow. Although some Westerners have
realized that it is hard for them to understand China's development
using old theories and perspectives, they still cannot rid
themselves of these influences when analyzing China. This time,
though, reporting by Western media has been more objective and not
as 'black and white' as previous reporting. China and Western
countries need more communication and exchanges to enhance mutual
trust and understanding."



2. U.S. AND CHINA IN AFRICA

"Western countries need to learn from China how to respect Africa"

The China Radio International sponsored newspaper World News Journal
(Shijie Xinwenbao) (08/11): "Western media claim that Secretary
Clinton's visit to Africa was aimed at China since the U.S.'s
influence in Africa has been challenged by China. The Western world
has always viewed African countries as passive players in
international relations, players that can be easily manipulated and
influenced by other powers. African countries realize that they
cannot elicit real concern from Western powers about their
livelihood even if they sacrifice their dignity. In contrast, China
respects African countries' political dignity and expresses real
concern about bringing African people dignified lives through
economic cooperation with Africa. Only by viewing African countries
on an equal basis can [foreign countries] win real friendship with
them. Western countries should learn from China how to respect
Africa."



3. U.S.-CHINA TRADE RELATIONS

"China should counter-attack U.S. trade protectionism"

The official Communist Party international news publication Global
Times (Huanqiu Shibao) (07/29): "The possible U.S. sanctions against
China's tire industry have created a dangerous situation for China's
tire exports. China should enact countermeasures as soon as
possible. Once the special protection measure (on tire imports) is
implemented, there will be a big trade dispute between China and the
U.S. The U.S. should not expect China to just bear the punishment.
While the U.S. is setting limits on Chinese imports, China can also
set limits on imports of U.S. products. In addition, China is the
biggest holder of U.S. Treasury bonds, and has every reason to sell
the bonds and make the U.S. pay a heavy price for its actions.
Surely this will result in a lose-lose situation. However, using
such countermeasures can demonstrate the country's deterrent
ability, through which it can avoid being taken advantage of in
trade negotiations and prevent the break out of a trade war. China
must learn from the tire case to be more flexible in using
counter-measures within the framework of the World Trade
Organization to increase its influence in trade negotiations. China
should learn to fight for every penny with strong and fair
arguments."


GOLDBERG