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IdentifierCreatedClassificationOrigin
09ABUDHABI979 2009-10-15 13:53:00 CONFIDENTIAL//NOFORN Embassy Abu Dhabi
Cable title:  

UAE CHARGES 3 WITH TALIBAN FINANCING

Tags:   EFIN PTER PGOV PINR PK AF AE 
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VZCZCXRO0872
PP RUEHDE RUEHDH RUEHDIR
DE RUEHAD #0979 2881353
ZNY CCCCC ZZH
P 151353Z OCT 09
FM AMEMBASSY ABU DHABI
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 2993
INFO RUEHDE/AMCONSUL DUBAI PRIORITY 8456
RUEATRS/DEPT OF TREASURY WASHINGTON DC
RHMFISS/HQ USCENTCOM MACDILL AFB FL
RUEHZM/GULF COOPERATION COUNCIL COLLECTIVE
RUEHBUL/AMEMBASSY KABUL 0519
					  C O N F I D E N T I A L ABU DHABI 000979 

NOFORN
SIPDIS

DEPARTMENT FOR SRAP, SCA/A, NEA/FO, NEA/ARP (MCGOVERN), S/CT AND INR

E.O. 12958: DECL: 10/14/2019
TAGS: EFIN PTER PGOV PINR PK AF AE
SUBJECT: UAE CHARGES 3 WITH TALIBAN FINANCING

REFS: A) ABU DHABI 890
B) ABU DHABI 877
C) ABU DHABI 845
D) TD 314-005442-09 (01/26/09)

CLASSIFIED BY AMBASSADOR RICHARD OLSON FOR REASONS 1.4 (B AND D).



1. (C/NF) Summary: On September 28, Abu Dhabi based English language
daily The National reported that seven Emiratis and one Afghan
national had been charged with funneling money to the Taliban and
supporting terrorist activity. The defendants reportedly denied the
charges and said confessions were coerced. The case was first
reported by Arabic and English language media on September 8,
although initially without reference to Taliban financing. The next
court appearance is scheduled for October 19, with arguments likely
to continue for several weeks. The decision to publicize the case
indicates UAE officials' commitment to combating terrorism - and
domestic support for foreign terrorist organizations (Refs A-C). End
summary.



2. (C/NF) A journalist covering the story told EconOff on October 15
that, according to court, legal and family sources, the eight
individuals were part of a group of 21 arrested in Khor Fakkan (an
exclave of the Emirate of Sharjah located on the East Coast of the
UAE) in October 2008. The 21 included 19 Emiratis, one Egyptian and
one Afghani who all worshipped at the Abdulrahman Al Dekal mosque,
where the Afghani was the imam. (Note: The reporter did not know if
the mosque was government operated or illegal. End Note.) At the
time, the reporter said government sources reported the arrests were
related to charges of alcohol and immigration violations, not
terrorism. (Note: The circumstances of this case are similar to one
reported in Ref D. However, that information did not include
accusations of Taliban financing. End Note.)



3. (C/NF) At their first appearance at the Federal Supreme Court on
September 7, the eiH$y>Q}1QLARthe financing had been presented.
One Emirati told the judge he was too indebted to give money to the
Afghan, while another reported he gave the imam money for a car. On
October 11, a government security official testified for the
prosecution, but the hearing was closed to the public. Additional
witnesses are expected to be heard on October 19. The reporter said
the trial is likely to continue for a number of weeks before a
judgment is issued.



4. (C/NF) It is particularly noteworthy that the UAE press --
including Arabic papers -- covered the story. The reporter told
EconOff that government-inOh/=tuXS@y Al Amoudi commended the
government's transparency as well as rule of law in the UAE. In the
column titled "Brain Immunization," Al Amoudi wrote, "Our utmost
priority is to prevent our youngsters' brains...and educate them
about the pain caused by those who deform religion." The case was
also discussed in online forums by Emiratis who commented that the
coverage was unprecedented.



5. (C) Comment: Press coverage of the case is clearly intended to
send a message to UAE nationals that the funding of domestic and
foreign terrorism will not be tolerated, specifically including the
Taliban. Post continues to press government sources for additional
details. End Comment.
OLSON