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IdentifierCreatedClassificationOrigin
08ULAANBAATAR246 2008-05-28 00:58:00 UNCLASSIFIED Embassy Ulaanbaatar
Cable title:  

ULAANBAATAR HOSTS INT'L SYMPOSIUM ON EMERGING INFECTIOUS

Tags:   KFLU PREL AORC EAGR TBIO SOCI PGOV EAIDMG 
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RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING 6187
RUEHTA/AMEMBASSY ASTANA 0048
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RUEAUSA/DEPT OF HHS WASHINGTON DC
RUEHPH/CDC ATLANTA GA
RUCPDOC/DEPT OF COMMERCE WASHINGTON DC
RUEHRC/USDA FAS WASHINGTON DC
RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHINGTON DC
RHHMUNA/HQ USPACOM HONOLULU HI
RUEHLMC/MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORP WASHINGTON DC
					UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 ULAANBAATAR 000246 

SIPDIS

DEPT FOR S/GAC, EAP/CM, OES.
BEIJING FOR USDA, APHIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: KFLU PREL AORC EAGR TBIO SOCI PGOV EAIDMG
SUBJECT: ULAANBAATAR HOSTS INT'L SYMPOSIUM ON EMERGING INFECTIOUS
DISEASES

ULAANBAATA 00000246 001.2 OF 002




1. SUMMARY: Leading American and Mongolian authorities on infectious
diseases gathered in Ulaanbaatar on May 15 and 16 to take part in an
international symposium on Emerging Infectious Diseases. Twenty-six
scientists made presentations at the symposium, which was
facilitated by Post and which attracted experts from the fields of
medicine, veterinary science, public health, epidemiology and
environmental health. The symposium succeeded in promoting
networking between American and Mongolian specialists in these
fields, bridging gaps between experts from the various fields who
often work in relative isolation. The participants were selected by
two doctors with extensive expertise: Greg Gray, Director of the
Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases at the University of Iowa's
College of Public Health; and N. Khurelbaatar, Deputy Director of
Mongolia's National Center for Communicable Diseases.
Participants shared information on the emergence of new infectious
diseases, such as Avian Influenza, and focused on diseases that can
pass between humans and animals -- particularly important for
Mongolia, with its population of 40 million livestock. In recent
years, Mongolia has registered several new infectious diseases
within its borders, but an improving economy is helping to decrease
overall infection rates. END SUMMARY.



2. Doctors, vets, epidemiologists, experts on environmental health
and others international leaders in the field of infectious diseases
converged on Ulaanbaatar on May 15 and 16, taking part in an
International Symposium on Emerging Infectious Diseases.. The
participants exchanged information on a wide range of illnesses and
their pathogens-- avian influenza, arboviruses and viral hemorrhagic
fevers, which include dengue, chikunya, Rift Valley fever, West
Nile, yellow fever, Ebola and Marburg. Also discussed were cholera,
meningococcoal meningitis, v-CJD, antibiotic-resistant M.
tuberculosis, S. aureus.influenza, hepatitis, rabies, brucellosis,
and HIV. Twenty-six scientists from the US and Mongolia made
presentation at the symposium. The American participants, who
funded their own travel and expenses, also toured local hospitals
and academic institutions, thanks to arrangements made by their
Mongolian counterparts.

INFECTION RATES FALLING, BUT NEW DISEASES ON THE RISE


--------------------------



--------------------------





3. The incidence rates of registered human infectious diseases in
Mongolia have changed dramatically since the country started keeping
records in 1952. This is due primarily to economic and social
improvements, as well as the introduction of effective vaccination
programs. Today, Mongolia registers some 40 human infectious
diseases, including the following 12 nosological forms first
registered within the last 20 years: rubella (1987), HIV/AIDS(1987),
hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (1997), trichomoniasis (1998),
neonatal sepsis (2001), mycosis (2001), acute diarrhea (2001), SARS
(2003), tick-borne encephalitis (2003), tick-borne borreliosis
(2003), tick-borne rickettsiosis (2005), and erythema infectiosa
(2005). The last decade has also witnessed a re-emergence of some
"old" human infectious diseases, such as gonococcal infections,
chickenpox, tuberculosis and food-borne intoxications. Officially
unregistered infections, such as Helicobacter pylori, are also
growing in number.MONITORING AND PREVENTION


--------------------------





4. High on the agenda at the symposium was monitoring and prevention
of transmission from animals to humans. Of 335 new infectious
diseases registered over the last 60 years worldwide, 60% are
zoonotic, meaning they can pass from animals to humans. 54% of
emerging infectious diseases are microbe-based, most of which are
drug resistant. Mongolia, with nearly 40 million livestock and
numerous wild animals, is particularly vulnerable and needs to
expand its research on zoonotic infections and bring in new
diagnostic technologies and equipment. Although Mongolia is remote

ULAANBAATA 00000246 002.2 OF 002


and relatively isolated, the SARS outbreak demonstrated that a
highly pathogenic infectious disease in a remote region of the globe
can spread around the world in a matter of days or weeks.



5. Dr. Gray pointed out that epidemiological studies show
considerable evidence that swine workers, poultry workers, hunters,
and veterinarians have received zoonotic influenza A virus
infections. While the data suggest that the majority of these
infections were mild or sub-clinical, available data suggest that
agriculture workers may contribute to a generation of novel viruses,
and serve as a bridging population for influenza viruses spread
between animals and man. Mathematical modeling has demonstrated
that such workers may accelerate the spread of pandemic viruses.
The most common animal infectious diseases in Mongolia include foot
and mouth disease (FMD), brucellosis, anthrax, rabies, hemorrhagic
septicemia, equine infectious anemia (EIA), glanders and
mycoplasmosis.

INCREASING US-MONGOLIAN COLLABORATION


--------------------------





6. A major achievement of the symposium was the networking between
the Mongolian and American scientists with ongoing plans to
collaborate on future projects. Plans are underway to hold another
symposium in 2009 to help foster the new international relationships
in the fight against infectious disease.



7. The symposium was organized by Dr. Khurelbaatar, Deputy Director
of the National Center for Communicable Diseases, and Dr. Gregory
Gray, Director, Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases and
Professor at the University of Iowa College of Public Health.
Financial support for the symposium was provided by the World Health
Organization. Among those who addressed the gathering were
Mongolia's Vice Health Minister, Dr. Tsolmon, and WHO Representative
Robert Hagan. The Charge hosted a reception for the organizers and
participants. The symposium coincided with an outbreak of hand,
foot, and mouth disease and the Mongolian Government's response to a
possible Enterovirus 71 (EV71) outbreak. The local press published
the Embassy's press release on the symposium.

MINTON