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Identifier
Created
Classification
Origin
05WELLINGTON957
2005-12-13 00:16:00
UNCLASSIFIED
Embassy Wellington
Cable title:  

NEW ZEALAND: COUNTRY REPORTS ON TERRORISM

Tags:   PTER  ASEC  KCRM  EFIN  KHLS  KPAO  NZ 
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VZCZCXRO2657
PP RUEHAP
DE RUEHWL #0957/01 3470016
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 130016Z DEC 05
FM AMEMBASSY WELLINGTON
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 2127
INFO RUEHAP/AMEMBASSY APIA PRIORITY 0170
RUEHBY/AMEMBASSY CANBERRA PRIORITY 4225
RUEHSV/AMEMBASSY SUVA PRIORITY 0422
RUEILB/NCTC WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY
						UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 WELLINGTON 000957 

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

STATE FOR S/CT (RHONDA SHORE AND ED SALAZAR) AND EAP/ANZ

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PTER ASEC KCRM EFIN KHLS KPAO NZ
SUBJECT: NEW ZEALAND: COUNTRY REPORTS ON TERRORISM

REF: STATE 193439



1. The following is Embassy Wellington's submission for the
2005 Country Terrorism Report on New Zealand:

New Zealand

New Zealand has a strong capacity to develop and implement
counter-terrorism policies, and further strengthened its role
in the global war on terror in 2005 through domestic
legislation. New Zealand has ratified twelve of the thirteen
United Nations anti-terrorism conventions, and signed the new
International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of
Nuclear Terrorism in September 2005.

Domestic Counter-terrorism Legislation

In December 2004, the Government introduced a bill into
Parliament to extend until 2007 New Zealand's UN Security
Council-related designations of terrorist organizations. In
June 2005, New Zealand's Parliament passed the Terrorism
Suppression Amendment Act 2005, which expanded the scope of
the criminalization of the financing of terrorism to include
the intentional financing of non-designated organizations
that engage in terrorism. The Amendment also extends until
2007 New Zealand's UN Security Council-related designations
of terrorist organizations. Passage of the amendment brought
New Zealand into full compliance with FATF Special
Recommendation II (Terrorist Financing). As of the end of
2005, New Zealand had designated 420 terrorist organizations
and was considering adding more to the list. To date, no
funds belonging to these designated organizations have been
found in New Zealand. In April 2005, Parliament passed the
Charities Act, which established a Charities Commission to
regulate and monitor charitable entities. Charities will be
obliged to register with the Commission in order to gain tax
exempt status. A charity will not be able to register if it
is a designated terrorist entity or convicted of any offense
under the Terrorism Suppression Act.

New Zealand Police continue to strengthen their domestic
counter-terrorism capacity. Building on increased capacity
in intelligence gathering, both domestically and
internationally, and enhanced tactical responses, in 2005 the
Police established regional teams to improve police
investigation of national security-related matters.

Since the events of September 11, 2001, New Zealand has also
worked to strengthen its border controls and intelligence
capabilities to prevent terrorists and terrorist groups from
using New Zealand territory or facilities. No terrorists or
terrorist organizations are known to be in New Zealand.

The country also takes seriously the need to prevent the
spread of Weapons of Mass Destruction. New Zealand has
participated in Proliferation Security Initiative exercises,
supported the inclusion of export security issues in APEC,

and, as part of its Supply Chain Security Strategy, works
with US Customs officials to identify and intercept high risk
shipping containers.

International cooperation

New Zealand also has continued cooperative efforts to enhance
counter-terrorism capacity in the Pacific and
internationally. New Zealand played a leading role
organizing and funding (through the Pacific Security Fund)
the first Pacific Islands Forum-wide counter-terrorism
contingency planning exercise, Exercise READY PASIFIKA, which
took place in Suva, Fiji in November 2005. The exercise
brought together senior counter-terrorism officials from all
Pacific Islands Forum countries to assess their capacity to
plan for, and respond to, a developing terrorist incident.
Exercise READY PASIFIKA focused on four specific themes:
internal cooperation and coordination; legal frameworks (with
a particular focus on terrorist financing measures); border
security (especially port and immigration security) and
regional co-operation. The exercise was widely welcomed as a
success and New Zealand will host a third "follow-up and next
steps" phase in April 2006.

In June 2005, New Zealand hosted the inaugural Pacific
Working Group on Counter-Terrorism (WGCT) in Auckland. The
WGCT brought together counter-terrorism officials from
Pacific Islands Forum member countries, Forum observer
countries, and relevant regional organizations to discuss the
region's priorities, challenges and progress in implementing
the international counter-terrorism agenda. The Forum

WELLINGTON 00000957 002 OF 002


Regional Security Committee (FRSC) endorsed the WGCT report
and agreed the Working Group should reconvene in 2006. New
Zealand has actively encouraged the UN Counter-Terrorism
Committee Chair to attend the 2006 WGCT and she has agreed to
do so subject to timing.

New Zealand has also offered assistance to Pacific Islands
Forum member countries to help them submit required reporting
under UN Security Council Resolutions 1267, 1373
(counter-terrorism) and 1540 (Weapons of Mass Destruction).
So far seven Pacific Island countries have responded
positively to this offer and assistance is now being provided
to them.

In June 2005, New Zealand concluded a bilateral MOU on
Enhanced Counter-Terrorism Cooperation with Fiji. New
Zealand signed a Joint Declaration to Combat International
Terrorism with ASEAN in July 2005.

New Zealand Police continued its relationship with Indonesian
National Police under its bilateral MOU on co-operation in
countering terrorism. The NZ Police provided practical
assistance to Indonesia following the second series of
attacks in Bali in October 2005.

Other initiatives

NZ has been a strong supporter of the Australia and Indonesia
Interfaith Dialogue Initiative (IFD). New Zealand sent a
strong delegation to the inaugural meeting of this process
in Yogyakarta Indonesia in December 2004. The meeting
included representatives of the region's faith communities
from the ASEAN countries, Australia, New Zealand, Papua New
Guinea and Timor-Leste. New Zealand, along with Australia,
Indonesia, and the Philippines, is a member of an officials'
steering committee overseeing the organization of a second
IFD meeting, to be held in the Philippines in March 2006.


McCormick