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IdentifierCreatedClassificationOrigin
05BRATISLAVA140 2005-02-19 13:07:00 SECRET Embassy Bratislava
Cable title:  

PRIME MINISTER'S LIKELY THEMES WITH PRESIDENT BUSH

Tags:   PREL LO 
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					  S E C R E T BRATISLAVA 000140 

SIPDIS


DEPT FOR EUR (JONES/CONLEY) AND CA
NSC FOR FRIED/HAINES/WILSON

E.O. 12958: DECL: 02/21/2030
TAGS: PREL LO
SUBJECT: PRIME MINISTER'S LIKELY THEMES WITH PRESIDENT BUSH


Classified By: CDA SCOTT N. THAYER FOR REASONS 1.4 (B) AND(D)




1. (S) Charge was briefed evening of February 19 by Milan
Jezovica, the Prime Minister's foreign policy adviser, of the
principal themes PM Mikulas Dzurinda would likely use during
his February 24 meeting with the President. Jezovica began
by noting that the Prime Minister was very excited about the
President's visit, recognizes there is not much time during
the formal visit, and thus will very welcoming but
business-like. The PM will focus on three themes: freedom,
economic development, and future generations. Jezovica spoke
from rough notes and used the opportunity to explore
formulations, phrasings, and vocabulary (the Prime Miniser
will speak in English).



2. (C) The more freedom we have, the better we live. The
global process of enlarging the space of freedom and
stability requires leadership and the
cooperation/contributions of many. It is thus in the
interest of Slovakia to have world leaders like the
President. Success in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo, and
elsewhere proves the wisdom of a policy of engagement, and
thus the need to continue that policy. Slovakia will play
its part as a matter of principle and national interest.



3. (C) Referring to the President's meeting the same day
with Russian President Putin, the PM will caution that we
should have "no illusions" about Russia. The key to Russia
is Ukraine -- the stronger democracy is in Ukraine, the
better chance for it to take hold in Russia, as well as
Ukraine's northern (Belarus) and southern (Moldova)
neighbors. Dzurinda has met on several occasions with
Yushenko and has invited Timosenko for an official visit even
before her confirmation by the rada. We should be demanding
of Yushenko that he promote reform, but fair in our
expectations (and supportive).



4. (C) Dzurinda will point out to the President that many
of the economic reforms that have proved so successful in
Slovakia (flat tax, health care reform, etc.) had their
intellectual origins in the U.S. He will stress the need
for, and open door to, additional U.S. investment and note
that it is a win-win for the U.S. and Slovak economies.



5. (C) The long term relations between our two countries
depend upon future generations knowing and understanding each
other better. Dzurinda will welcome the visa waiver roadmap,
but press for additional steps. U.S. visa policy remains
incongruous as Slovakia has entered the EU. Slovaks have
enjoyed freedom of movement throughout Europe for the past
fifteen years without dire security or economic consequences,
which U.S. policy needs to recognize.



6. (S) COMMENT: As the above shows, many of the themes the
President is likely to include in his own remarks will be
preaching to the choir. Dzurinda's instincts are inherently
Transatlantic, but his government is often reactive and
reticent to press its views in NATO and EU councils. The
President could usefully temper his praise for Dzurinda's and
Slovakia's accomplishments with encouragement to take a more
proactive role in supporting our common goals and interests.
THAYER


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