wikileaks ico  Home papers ico  Cables mirror and Afghan War Diary privacy policy Privacy
Identifier
Created
Classification
Origin
06LIMA1549
2006-04-24 17:54:00
UNCLASSIFIED
Embassy Lima
Cable title:  

EMBASSY'S ASSESSMENT OF OAS MONITORING OF PERUVIAN

Tags:   PGOV  PREL  OAS  PE 
pdf how-to read a cable
VZCZCXYZ0000
PP RUEHWEB

DE RUEHPE #1549 1141754
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 241754Z APR 06
FM AMEMBASSY LIMA
TO SECSTATE WASHDC PRIORITY 9956
						UNCLAS LIMA 001549 

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

DEPT FOR WHA/AND, USOAS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PGOV PREL OAS PE
SUBJECT: EMBASSY'S ASSESSMENT OF OAS MONITORING OF PERUVIAN
ELECTIONS

REF: A. LIMA 1509


B. LIMA 1373



1. As noted in Ref A, Embassy Lima participated in force in
the Organization of American States (OAS) Election
Observation Mission for the 4/9 Peruvian general elections,
and thus had the opportunity to evaluate the Mission's
performance at all levels. Lloyd Axworthy's leadership of
the delegation was superb. He established credibility by
carrying out a broad and intense schedule of consultations
leading up to election day, and visited a large sampling of
Lima polling sites in the course of the voting itself.
Especially in light of the close race among the top three
contenders, Axworthy made an important contribution to the
public perception that the election had been fair and
transparent, and helped to overcome criticisms of the process
by candidate Ollanta Humala. Axworthy put himself at
personal risk when he helped to extricate Humala from a
threatening, potentially volatile situation at Humala's own
polling site (Ref B).



2. The Canadian diplomatic mission in Lima also deserves
credit for the success of the OAS observer group. Canadian
Ambassador Genevieve des Rivieres was an energetic activist
in this endeavor, coordinating the recruitment of a sizable
group of capable volunteer monitors.



3. The OAS staffers charged with organizing and briefing the
volunteer monitors in Lima were in many ways ill-prepared and
ineffectual. U.S. personnel participated in two separate
briefings by the OAS staff. Both of the briefings started
very late; the second, attended by most of the Embassy
observers, was an hour behind schedule. The briefing itself
was rambling and confusing. Briefing materials were
distributed that were not adequately explained, and some of
the documentation, such as a massive compendium on Peruvian
election laws, was clearly inappropriate. The checklist for
monitors that was given out was a poorly executed and
practically illegible photostatic copy, and the briefer
failed to explain that the checklist was to be used only by
the small group of monitors taking part in the "quick count"
sampling of election returns. Our Canadian colleagues
recounted similar deficiencies at the briefing they received.



4. Embassy requests that USOAS bring this feedback to the
attention of officials in the Secretariat for appropriate
follow-up action.
STRUBLE