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IdentifierCreatedClassificationOrigin
05SANJOSE2744 2005-11-29 22:41:00 UNCLASSIFIED Embassy San Jose
Cable title:  

COSTA RICA: SUSPENSION OF TITLE III OF THE

Tags:   ETRD ETTC PREL CS 
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					  UNCLAS SAN JOSE 002744 

SIPDIS

DEPARTMENT FOR WHA/CCA AND WHA/CEN JASON MACK

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: ETRD ETTC PREL CS
SUBJECT: COSTA RICA: SUSPENSION OF TITLE III OF THE
LIBERTAD ACT

REF: A. SECSTATE 207359


B. SAN JOSE 1303

C. 04 SAN JOSE 3225



1. Costa Rica remains an outspoken critic of the Castro
government and a faithful supporter of governmental and human
rights reforms in Cuba. Costa Rica severed diplomatic ties
with Cuba in 1961, and has shown no signs that it would
consider re-establishing formal relations with the Castro
government. In the interest of strengthening regional
support for U.S. policies in Cuba, the USG should continue to
waive the right to bring an action against Costa Rican
entities under Title III of the Libertad Act.



2. During the latter half of 2005, Costa Rica continued its
long-standing, mostly passive opposition to the Castro regime
in Cuba. Costa Rica's long-held democratic principles
dictate that it oppose oppressive regimes generally; its
proximity to Cuba demands that Costa Rica specifically oppose
the Castro government. Apart from the April session of the
UN Commission on Human Rights, in which Costa Rica split from
its Central American neighbors to co-sponsor a resolution
condemning Cuba's human rights record, Costa Rica had few
formal opportunities to address Cuba on the international
stage.



3. As in past years, Costa Rica joined international calls
for an end to the U.S. economic embargo of Cuba at both the
UN General Assembly and at October's Ibero-American Summit in
Salamanca, Spain. This stance should not be read as support
for the Castro regime, but rather a disagreement over tactics.



4. Costa Rica has continued to accept refugees from Cuba,
both through direct applications and by participation in
regional refugee resettlement programs. By law, Costa Rican
immigration officials are legally prohibited from returning
travelers to Cuba against their will. Once they arrive in
Costa Rica, any Cuban national may claim asylum and petition
for refugee status. Costa Rican officials then work closely
with the UNHCR to determine placement for the refugee.
Through the first six months of 2005, the Office of
Immigration had received 38 applications for refugee status.



5. Per instructions in reftel A, post attempted to identify
any Costa Rican investments in Cuba. All of our inquiries
had negative results.
FRISBIE