wikileaks ico  Home papers ico  Cables mirror and Afghan War Diary privacy policy Privacy
Identifier
Created
Classification
Origin
05NDJAMENA140
2005-01-28 14:27:00
UNCLASSIFIED
Embassy Ndjamena
Cable title:  

SUPPORT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY: THE U.S.

Tags:   PGOV  PHUM  PREF  CD  SU 
pdf how-to read a cable
This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.


ACTION DRL-00   

INFO  LOG-00   NP-00    AF-00    AID-00   AMAD-00  CIAE-00  INL-00   
      DODE-00  DOEE-00  DS-00    EB-00    EUR-00   OIGO-00  FBIE-00  
      UTED-00  VC-00    H-00     TEDE-00  INR-00   IO-00    LAB-01   
      L-00     VCE-00   M-00     NEA-00   DCP-00   NSAE-00  NSCE-00  
      OIC-00   NIMA-00  PA-00    MCC-00   PM-00    GIWI-00  PRS-00   
      P-00     SP-00    SSO-00   SS-00    STR-00   TRSE-00  FMP-00   
      BBG-00   R-00     IIP-00   PMB-00   DSCC-00  PRM-00   G-00     
      NFAT-00  SAS-00     /001W
                  ------------------AC403E  281503Z /38    
FM AMEMBASSY NDJAMENA
TO SECSTATE WASHDC 0872
INFO AMEMBASSY ABUJA 
AMEMBASSY ADDIS ABABA 
AMEMBASSY BAMAKO 
AMEMBASSY DAKAR 
AMEMBASSY KHARTOUM 
AMEMBASSY LONDON 
AMEMBASSY NIAMEY 
AMEMBASSY PARIS 
AMEMBASSY YAOUNDE 
USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 
USLO TRIPOLI 
USMISSION GENEVA
						UNCLAS  NDJAMENA 000140 

SIPDIS


DEPARTMENT FOR DRL FOR HARVEY, INR, AF, AF/C, AF/SPG, PRM,
USAID/OTI; LONDON AND PARIS FOR AFRICAWATCHERS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PGOV PHUM PREF CD SU
SUBJECT: SUPPORT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY: THE U.S.
RECORD IN CHAD

REF: STATE 267453



1. The Government's human rights record remains poor.
Security forces committed extrajudicial killings and
continued to intimidate the public. The judiciary remained
subject to executive interference. Violence and societal
discrimination against women were common. The independent
press occasionally experienced government interference.
Landmines remain a key problem in northern Chad, where over
one million mines are left over from the civil war. Women,s
rights and trafficking in persons are issues of concern.
President Idriss Deby has ruled Chad since taking power in a
1990 rebellion. He was reelected President in May 2001.
Fraud, vote rigging, and local irregularities marred the 2001
presidential election and the April legislative elections.
Currently, the Government is proceeding with amending the
Constitution to allow for unlimited presidential terms. If
the public referendum on the amendments passes, Deby would be
able to stand for election again in the next presidential
elections in 2006.



2. The Embassy,s human rights objectives in Chad include
strengthening respect for rule of law, professionalization of
Chad's security forces, bolstering the judicial system and
the independent media, the transparent management of the
country's oil revenues, outreach to the Muslim community,
advancing women's issues, and support for efforts to resolve
the humanitarian crisis in eastern Chad. The Embassy's
strategy for improving Chad's human rights situation focuses
on engaging directly with key government officials and
improving interaction between the government and human rights
groups. Efforts are also being made to strengthen the
credibility and capacity of civil society groups and
governmental institutions in addressing human rights abuses,
including involving them in the visits of high level U.S.
Government officials. The Embassy's goal is to help human
rights groups and other civil society organizations become a
resource for both the government and Chadian people on human
rights issues. In the absence of a US AID mission, the
Embassy seeks funding from a number of sources to find ways
to meet its goals. An example of a low or no cost way of
facilitating dialogue is that of creating opportunities for
activists and government officials to interact together in
professional and social settings. A reception in honor of a
Chadian human rights activist who won the Robert F. Kennedy
Human Rights Prize was well-attended by government ministers,
human rights activists, journalists, and opposition
politicians.



3. The professionalization of Chad,s security forces is a
key component of the U.S. Government,s strategy for
improving the country,s record. Department of Defense

programs include the International Military Education and
Training (IMET) and Counter Terrorism Fellowship Programs
CTFP) at U.S. military facilities, where training on human
rights is incorporated into the courses. U.S. Marines
trained 170 members of the Republican Guard in June and July
in Chad. In addition, 48 Chadian police officers and
immigration officials received anti-terrorism training in the
United States and Chad. All training candidates were vetted
through the Department of State,s screening system to ensure
compliance with the Leahy Amendment. The Embassy,s Public
Affairs Section held a public seminar on the role of the
military in a democracy. The U.S. Government also funds
de-mining activities in northern Chad.



4. The U.S. is using direct contact with Chadian soldiers,
including training and visits by U.S. Government officials,
and the sharing of information on human rights violations
with high level Chadian government officials to emphasize the
importance of working together on human rights. The annual
human rights report is being used as a basis for
collaboration. To date, Chadian government officials have
been candid and responsive. Visiting Congressional
delegations have supported the Embassy's human rights agenda.



5. Human rights activists and government officials
acknowledge that strengthening Chad,s weak judicial system
is critical to addressing human rights violations in a


systematic and meaningful way. To this end, the Embassy is
using Economic Support funds to provide manual typewriters
and copies of relevant legal codes to the courts as well as
training for magistrates. The Public Affairs Section
sponsored an International Visitors Program on the U.S.
judicial system. The Democracy and Human Rights Fund (DHRF)
is being used to support legal assistance to victims of human
rights abuses through the non-governmental Droits de l'Homme
Sans Frontiers. Several government ministries expressed
support for the program and offered their assistance to DHSF
if needed.



6. To strengthen the Chadian media's ability to promote
human rights and good governance, Economic Support Funds are
being used to provide equipment and training to print and
broadcast journalists. A DHRF grant funded the creation of a
private radio station in the far north. A training workshop
was held for Arabic media with a speaker from Voice of
America. The Embassy interacts regularly with the Chadian
media and facilitates coverage of U.S. Government events.



7. U.S. Government support for good governance and
transparency also included an International Visitor Program
on Grassroots Democracy for Young Leaders, a speaker program
on the links between good governance, accountability, and
transparency, and a book program on how to fight corruption.
In addition, the U.S. Treasury continues to provide technical
assistance to the Oil Revenue Management College, the
accountability mechanism which is reviewing the projects
financed by Chadian oil revenues. The Ambassador hosted a
U.S. election coverage event that was widely attended by
government officials, Chadian political parties, and
journalists. At this event and in meetings between Chadian
government officials, Embassy officers and visiting
delegations emphasized the importance of the election process
in sustaining democratic transitions.



8. The promotion of civil rights and civil liberties is
being funded by the Human Rights and Democracy Fund (HDRF).
The funding for a bi-weekly radio broadcast covering a wide
range of human rights issues and civil liberties and civil
rights education will be the first of its kind in Chad. The
program "The Right To Know" will be shared with other radio
stations and translated into several local languages to help
increase public awareness of their basic rights. The talk
show will be supported by town hall meetings in several
cities to encourage discussion between citizens and their
local government and security officials on their rights.



9. The U.S. Government,s Muslim outreach programs continue.
The Embassy supported a program promoting bilingualism with
the Al Mouna Center, a respected organization which promotes
cross-cultural understanding. A week-long speaker program in
Abeche, eastern Chad, with an American imam sparked a great
deal of interest and exchange of information with Chadian
Muslims. This visit advanced religious freedom through the
promotion of dialogue between faiths and among Muslims on key
human rights issues. The Embassy used funding from ACCESS to
fund microscholarships for 75 children as part of its efforts
to reach out to underserved populations.



10. The Embassy has provided several grants for the purpose
of eliminating the practice of Female Genital Mutilation
(FGM). Its support to a local NGO resulted in the drafting
and enactment of a law which criminalizes FGM, and in FY
2004, it funded an education program to publicize and
distribute copies of the law. The Public Diplomacy Section
held a panel discussion on female genital mutilation and
gender and development in an effort to promote women's
rights. The visit of an American imam to eastern Chad also
promoted a better understanding of women's rights and
equality issues under Islam. In addition, embassy officers
engaged government and non-governmental organizations on
trafficking in persons and began planning to facilitate a
child protection network to bring together concerned
government officials, police, and non-governmental
organizations on a range of issues affecting children. The
promotion of girls' education has also been a focus of the
Embassy's efforts during the 2000-2004 period, using funds


from the Ambassador's Girls Scholarship Program to encourage
the education of girls. During the 2003/2004 school year, an
estimated 5,000 elementary school girls and their families
received support under this program, and the rate of female
attendance at the 60 pilot schools where the program was
implemented increased significantly. In addition, Embassy
employees are funding school tuition for a group young girls.
Congressional visitors have also met with key officials and
non-governmental organizations on women's issues and HIV/AIDS.



11. The ongoing humanitarian crisis in Darfur, Sudan deeply
affects Chad. Over 200,000 refugees have sought safety in
eastern Chad and the United States is the largest donor to
the ongoing humanitarian efforts. In July and August, the
U.S. Government undertook a comprehensive survey of Sudanese
refugees in Chad, which resulted in the Darfur Atrocities
Report and Secretary of State Powell's finding that genocide
is occurring in Sudan. In addition, the Embassy is an active
participant in the implementation of the Darfur Humanitarian
Cease-fire Agreement, which includes monthly meetings of a
Joint Commission. The Embassy has contributed personnel to
the Inter-Sudanese Peace Talks on Darfur and remains a key
interlocutor with the Government of Chad, the rebel
movements, and the African Union on the Darfur peace process.
The Embassy has also facilitated the work of human rights
organizations and non-governmental organizations working on
protection issues for refugee women and children.



12. Khartoum and Tripoli Minimize Considered.
WALL


NNNN