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Identifier
Created
Classification
Origin
05DUBLIN50
2005-01-14 18:34:00
CONFIDENTIAL
Embassy Dublin
Cable title:  

IRELAND SUPPORTS U.S.-PROPOSED SUA AMENDMENTS

Tags:   KNNP  MNUC  PARM  PREL  KTIA  PHSA  EWWT 
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						C O N F I D E N T I A L DUBLIN 000050 

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: DECL: 01/14/2015
TAGS: KNNP MNUC PARM PREL KTIA PHSA EWWT
SUBJECT: IRELAND SUPPORTS U.S.-PROPOSED SUA AMENDMENTS

REF: STATE 4828

Classified By: Political-Economic Counselor Mary Daly; Reasons 1.4 (B)
and (D).



1. (C) On January 14, Post delivered reftel talking points
to Declan Smith, Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) First
Secretary for Legal Affairs and Director for Law of the Sea

SIPDIS
Issues. (Eoin Fannon of Ireland's Attorney General's office
will participate in the EU's January 17 Law of the Sea
meeting (COMAR), which will aim to coordinate EU positions
for the January 31 International Maritime Organization (IMO)
Legal Committee meeting. Fannon, however, will be acting on
instructions from Smith's Legal Affairs Division in DFA.)
Smith said that Ireland, and the EU generally, supported the
U.S.-proposed amendments to the Convention on the Suppression
of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation
(SUA). Regarding the dual use provision, Smith noted that
COMAR would focus on eliminating imprecision in the draft IMO
Protocol on the SUA amendments regarding the criminalization
of the transport of items that are intended for use in the
manufacture or delivery of weapons of mass destruction (WMD).
He added that Ireland, along with most other EU Member
States, also supported the notion that the dual use offense
should cover transport to both state and non-state actors.
Smith observed that difficulties in concluding a final IMO
Protocol text derived from a lack of participation by
non-proliferation experts in IMO Legal Committee meetings
(consistent with reftel para 3). In Ireland's case, DFA had
to coordinate not only with the Attorney General's office,
but also the Department of Communication, the Marine and
Natural Resources, which would be responsible for new
domestic legislation to implement the IMO Protocol. Smith
expected U.S.-EU consensus on moving forward with the SUA
amendments, and he observed that the more difficult task
would be to convince other countries, such as Pakistan,
India, and China, as to the amendments' merits.
KENNY