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IdentifierCreatedClassificationOrigin
04KUWAIT1836 2004-06-10 08:30:00 UNCLASSIFIED Embassy Kuwait
Cable title:  

MEDIA REACTION KUWAIT JUNE 8-9: IRAQ; HUMAN RIGHTS

Tags:   OIIP KU KDMR 
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					  UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 KUWAIT 001836 

SIPDIS

STATE FOR INR/R/MR, NEA/ARP, NEA/PPD, PA, INR/NESA
STATE FOR IIP/G/NEA-SA, INR/B
WHITE HOUSE FOR PRESS OFFICE
LONDON FOR GOLDRICH, PARIS FOR O'FRIEL
USDOC FOR 4520/ANESA/ONE/FITZGERALD-WILKS
USDOC FOR ITA AND PTO/OLIA

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: OIIP KU KDMR
SUBJECT: MEDIA REACTION KUWAIT JUNE 8-9: IRAQ; HUMAN RIGHTS
REPORT



1. SUMMARY: Liberal commentators rose to defend the USG
against criticism of the State Department Supporting Human
Rights and Democracy report, characterized by Islamists as
"interference in Kuwaiti internal affairs." One
conservative MP also denounced US Embassy public diplomacy
programs and US Embassy attendance at social events as
"interference." Liberals see these attacks as evidence of
Islamists put on the defensive by public support by the
Kuwait government of women's rights. Iraq, however, remains
the greatest focus of attention as June 30 approaches.
Commentators express guarded optimism about the transfer and
the ability of the Iraqis to secure their future, but also
cited problems still ahead, particularly security. END
SUMMARY.



2. "Al-Yawar's Safety Comes First"
Sultan Bin Huthaileen wrote in Al-Watan (6/5): "The
fundamental issue which would be a real test for the new
Iraqi president is whether he would successfully be able to
protect himself and his colleagues in the new government.
The incidents of assassinations against the Iraqi government
members were perpetrated by remnants of Saddam's regime, and
aimed at unsettling Iraq's security, damaging economic
activity and thrusting the Iraqi people toward a culture of
violence and insecurity. If Al-Yawar's government is able
to counter this enormous challenge, then, undoubtedly, it
can uproot the malicious elements that have got Iraq into
such a predicament."



3. "The Brave"
Emad Al-Saif wrote in independent Al-Qabas (6/5): "All
these terrorists who have killed innocent people and
arranged for car bombs to be detonated in crowded civilian
areas around Iraq have attempted to play on sectarian
sentiments to start a civil war in Iraq. However, nothing
advantageous can come of this, because nothing can hinder
the transfer of sovereignty in Iraq. It is clear that the
Iraqi people are politically mature enough to perceive the
workings of such criminal plans, and determined enough to go
forward and advance, despite the difficulties."



4. "New World Order: Post Iraq"
Dr. Shafiq Al-Ghabra wrote in independent Al-Rai Al-A'am
(6/9): "The problems and the political complexities facing
the Arab world are far too great for one preeminent power to
solve. It is extremely difficult to solve such problems
unilaterally. Democracy in the Arab world must begin from
within. The idea of exporting democracy to the Arab world
was demolished after the war in Iraq. This war destroyed
the scope of the moral role of the United States,
particularly that America, as a preeminent power, is
spreading a universal message that calls for human rights
and democracy. As the exporter of democratic values, the
neoconservatives have failed dismally. This failure was due
to armed conflict, the general state of chaos, bad planning
and not least of all their ignorance in dealing with the
Iraqis. The main problem is not about overthrowing regimes,
but in the events and results afterwards."



5. "Too Much"
Dr. Shamlan Al-Issa wrote in independent Al-Seyassah (6/6):
"Islamic political groups, the National Assembly's Islamic
MPs in particular, have been escalating their criticism of
the United States and the American Embassy in Kuwait. The
latest criticism was attributed to MP Jassem Al-Kandari, who
accused the U.S. Department of State of interfering in
Kuwait's internal affairs. Al-Kandari also blasted the
State Department's Country Reports on Human Rights for
Kuwait, and said it undermined Kuwait's image abroad. It is
not the criticism that is odd, but the attempts by Islamic
bloc to impose their will and policies on the government and
community, something that is rejected by us, given the fact
that had it not been for the United States, our country
would have never been librated from the Iraqi occupation."



6. "The Sovereignty They Almost Crushed in 1990"
Saud Al-Samaka wrote in independent Al-Qabas (6/7): "The
accusations and claims leveled against the American Embassy
by the National Assembly's Islamic bloc, of interfering in
our internal affairs, are attempts to unsettle relations
between the United States and Kuwait, in particular after
America designated Kuwait a strategic ally. The United
States is the preeminent power today, and if her interests
were at stake, then it should not hesitate to intervene, as
happened during the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. We must
appreciate when the United Sates interferes, because if it
is to advise us on terrorism, then this will allow us to
take caution and prepare ourselves. If it is to advise on
democracy, then it is to our advantage to learn from her
long democratic experience. And if it is to help us utilize
our resources, then it is to help us acquire know-how. So
why should we refuse this?"



7. "America And Us"
Saud Al-Harbi wote in independent Al-Watan (6/8):
"America's political philosophy is a practical
interpretation of its pragmatism. We should have been aware
of that here in Kuwait. In spite of the great role America
played during the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, we still see
America in the same light as when it came to our aid nearly
twelve years ago. So, why do we still insist on defending
America as if we were ideologically linked to her? In fact,
we have become America's biggest defenders, as if we were
the ones responsible for her actions and mistakes. One such
example is the Abu Ghraib case. Despite our awareness that
Saddam committed worse atrocities against his people, we
should have rejected this conduct out of principle, and not
defended America. The reality is that we have to re-
evaluate the way we deal with America."



8. "What Goes Around Comes Around"
Dr. Sami Naser Khalifa wrote in independent Al-Rai Al-A'am
(6/9): "First, the occupation authority's latest military
operations are the main reason behind the Shiite-Sunni unity
in Iraq. Second, their wanton killing of Iraqi civilians
and destruction of people's homes exposed America's ugly
face. Third, with regard to our internal affairs, the
Kuwaiti foreign minister is practicing appeasement through
his denials on behalf of the American ambassador. Fourth,
continued American control of Iraq's oil and security is a
consolidation of the occupation. Fifth, every time an Arab
or Muslim is killed, American and Zionist foul play is
revealed."

URBANCIC